Category Archives: Upcoming Events

Lorraine O’Grady:
Both/And

Lorraine O’Grady: Both/And
March 5–July 18, 2021

Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 4th Floor

#LorraineOGradyBKM
Lorraine O’Grady: Both/And is the first retrospective of one of the most significant contemporary figures working in performance, conceptual, and feminist art.

The exhibition features twelve of the major projects O’Grady has produced over her four-decade career and also debuts a much-anticipated new installation. In addition to works presented in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, five of O’Grady’s projects are installed in collection galleries throughout the Museum, highlighting the artist’s long engagement with art historical omissions and institutional failings related to the creative agency of those excluded from the canon. O’Grady’s radical revisionism of the 1980s and 1990s anticipated themes that have been embraced by a younger generation of artists and thinkers, inspiring them to resist and reshape a world structured by difference and inequity.

For moe info: Brooklyn Museum

photo: Tiffany L Clark

Excerpt the New York Times Conversation with Lorraine O’Grady “Both Sides Now”

by Kate Guadagnino
Published Feb. 22, 2021
Updated Feb. 23, 2021, 2:02 p.m. ET

In 1977, in a nod to the Surrealists, the conceptual artist Lorraine O’Grady started cutting phrases out of The New York Times and rearranging them into lines of poetry, which she glued, mostly slantwise, onto sheets of rag paper: “Dinner is reserved for/Twin Speech: A Language of Their Own” reads one spliced fragment. She was in her early 40s. Fifteen years earlier, O’Grady had worked as an intelligence analyst for the federal government. During the Cuban Missile Crisis, she was tasked with reading around 10 international newspapers a day and, as she likes to say, “at a certain point, words just became gelatinous.” But from that experience O’Grady was able to extract new meaning out of language. “I did a poem a week, and when I got to the four-month mark, they started taking off, and I could tell something was happening,” she says, though the knowledge that her own ideas could carry her from one place or plane to the next must have already been familiar. In addition to her time in Washington D. C., her pre-artist life included stints as a translator, a teacher, a student of fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and, as if she weren’t already intimidating enough, a rock critic. “I don’t feel I’ve had much unlived life,” says O’Grady, now 86.

Next month, she’ll be the subject of a major retrospective — her first — at the Brooklyn Museum, its title, “Both/And,” a reference to her rejection of binary thinking, which not only oversimplifies but ultimately tips the scales of perception in favor of one side or the other. Much of O’Grady’s philosophy is informed by her sense of self as a Black American woman with Afro-Caribbean and Irish roots. In her artwork (she’s also a writer, and her 1994 art historical essay “Olympia’s Maid: Reclaiming Black Female Subjectivity,” is considered a canonical feminist text), she often explores the idea of multiplicity through the form of the diptych, which forces the viewer to hold two sides of something in their mind simultaneously. In 2017, O’Grady reworked her newspaper poems, cutting up their contents for a second time and turning them into two-panel haikus. Both versions of the project are included in the exhibition, as is “Miscegenated Family Album” (1980/1994), a series of diptychs in which O’Grady juxtaposes photos of her family with depictions of ancient Egyptian royals, thereby lessening the presumed distance between them.

Read the full conversation HERE

Ted Timreck
Hidden Landscapes

The Hidden Landscape Project

The Hidden Landscape Project represents the joined efforts of professional, Native, and antiquarian researchers who have generously volunteered to combine their expertise into a chronicle of research- a series of video stories that investigate the archaeological history and the modern legacy of the Northeastern Native civilization. The combined vision of so many researchers working together also represents a new approach to the long standing and often very heated controversy that surrounds the ceremonial stone landscapes of North America.

Join Doug Harris, Ceremonial Stone Landscapes researcher, Ted Timreck, director of the Hidden Landscapes films, and guest panelists for a five- part series featuring the films, panel discussions, and Q & A.

This series is co-sponsored by the Nolumbeka Project, River Valley Co-op, and the Karuna Center for Peace Building and a grant from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. Registration is required and limited to 500. Donations are requested. Pre-screenings are available for a fee at http://www.twtimreck.com.

Schedule
Saturday, February 13, 2 pm EST
The Great Falls, Part I: Discovery, Destruction and Preservation in a Massachusetts Town

Sunday, February 14, 2 pm EST
The Great Falls, Part II: Discovery, Destruction and Preservation in a Massachusetts Town

Saturday, March 6, 2 pm EST,
Before the Lake Was Champlain: An Untold Story of Ice Age America. Guest panelist Dr. Fred Wiseman

Saturday, March 13, 2 p.m. EST
The New Antiquarians, Working Together to Unlock the Mysterious Stone Ruins, Guest Panelist Evan Pritchard, Director Center for Algonquin Studies

Saturday, March 20, 2 p.m. EST
The Devil’s Footstep, A New Vision of Early Native Life, Guest panelist Tim Mentz, former Standing Rock Tribal Historic Preservation Officer (1996 to 2008)

To register and donate: Visit http://www.nolumbekaproject.org to register or donate.

The Great Falls, Discovery, Destruction and Preservation in a Massachusetts Town

The first of the Hidden Landscapes film series, will be featured in two parts:
February 13 and 14 at 2 pm EST.

The film begins in Turners Falls, Massachusetts, when the town was attempting to expand the runway of its airport. The plan called for the removal of a low hill that contained what Native American tribal representatives identify as a ritual site-a ceremonial stone landscape. The surprising discovery and the on-going effort to understand and protect what is an amazing and historical asset is a dramatic story of environmental and historic preservation.

Join Doug Harris, ceremonial stone landscapes researcher, and director Ted Timreck for the beginning for a five-part film journey of discovery of the forgotten history of the Indigenous cultures of the Northeast.

Click on Register for Webinar or visit www.nolumbekaproject.org to register. Limited to 500 participants. Donations requested.

About the presenters:
Doug Harris, Ceremonial Stone Landscapes Preservationist is a former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Narragansett, and does historical preservation work primarily in the Northeast
T. W. Timreck is a Peabody award-winning documentary filmmaker whose programs have been featured on PBS and other networks around the globe. “Hidden Landscapes” is a multi-part series that tells the story of early Eastern Native American sea cultures and offers a radical perspective on the Indigenous history of northeastern North America
Professor Frederick M. Wiseman is the Coordinator of the Vermont Indigenous Heritage Center, an Indigenous rights activist and author of many scholarly and popular books on archaeology, ethnohistory and ethnobotany
Evan Pritchard (Mi’kmaq descendant) is author of 18 hardcover and trade paperback titles (including four anthologies and two self-published paperbacks) plus 36 other self-published books to date. As a popular adjunct professor, he has taught courses in Native American studies at Marist, Vassar and Pace
Tim Mentz, of the Standing Rock Sioux of South Dakota, became the nation’s first Tribal Historic Preservation Officer(THPO), from 1996 to 2008. Tim is co-owner of Makoche Wowapi (earth writings), a 17-person cultural resources firm focused on identification and protection of Dakota/Lakota cultural heritage sites.

WESTFEST DANCE 2020
Performances online!

Click link below to catch the performances!

WESTFEST Program A

PROGRAM A initially live-streamed on November 14, 2020

WESTFEST Program B

PROGRAM B initially live-streamed on November 15, 2020

Join us for the 10th year anniversary of WestFest – The immensely popular curated yearly dance event at Westbeth!
Watch cutting-edge performances by emerging and established dancers and choreographers in this live streamed event.

Click here for more information: WestFest Dance

Westbeth
Open House New York

WATCH ON YOUTUBE

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Link Here to Open House NY Video Tour of Westbeth

Experience newly filmed vignettes of Westbeth the largest artists community in the country.

Resident artists lead individual video journeys around this landmarked building.

History, architecture, the arts and artists of Westbeth , and visits to artists’ studios are all a part of this online series.

More info at Open House New York

THE MUTATION SHOW A Film Screening

MUTATION SHOW

A film screening of the 1973 Open Theater production, directed by Joe Chaikin

Performance by The Open Theater, directed by Joseph Chaikin, a fluid montage of scenes, ideas and personalities, mostly created by the actors themselves in rehearsal, called “the mutation show.” With Joseph Chaikin, Raymond Barry, Shami Chaikin, Tina Shepard, Paul Zimet, Ellen Maddow, Tom Lillard, Jo Ann Schidman, presenting such characters as the tinker, the petrified man, the bird lady, the man who smiles, and the man who hits himself, a boy in a box, the animal girl, the ringmaster. Often the “language” is sound without dialogue. Often the “plot” refers to primal processes like learning to walk, learning civilization. At the conclusion each actor introduces himself/herself and gives background, biography, description of family, hair, eyes, etc. Each actor holds an early picture of himself. 1973.”