write-now-metro-news

News about WRITE NOW:
A Participatory Installation

write-now-metro-news

NEW YORK 1
New Yorkers are getting another chance to “post” about their emotions — but in the real world instead of social media.
They’re writing post-it notes at a new installation at a West Village art gallery.

Visitors first choose to make a charitable donation, and then answer one of four questions looking back on the past year, or forward to the new one.

Those responses take the form of words or drawings on post-it notes, which then hang in the gallery.

Organizers say this event is also a reaction to the political landscape.

“A lot of people are very angry and also very concerned about what’s happening here and that we are in New York,” said Karin Batten, Director of the Westbeth Gallery. “We are very multi-cultural and diverse and we want to keep it that way.”

“Events like this are so important,” said Manhattan State Senator Brad Hoylman. “It’s cathartic, it’s participatory but it also points us, I think, in a very positive direction as we start the New Year.”

A similar display popped up at the Union Square subway station last month for people to vent about the Presidential election’s outcome.

The exhibit opened Saturday and runs until New Year’s Eve.

http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/arts/2016/12/11/west-village-art-gallery-lets-patrons–post–about-their-status-as-part-of-a-new-exhibit–write-now-.html

METRO NEWS December 1, 2016

Write Now exhibit at Westbeth makes the post-it note fad high-brow

By: Amanda Mikelberg

A new interactive art installation looks like a rip-off on the subway post-it note phenomenon, but it’s actually honoring it.

A West Village exhibit is taking a page from the fluttering layers of post-it notes scrawled with messages of hope and frustration that have cropped up in underground passageways around the city since the election.

The “Write Now” exhibit is adopting the zeitgeist — this apparent need among New Yorkers to both purposefully express their feelings and strengthen a sense of community — and is taking it a step further. It’s recognizing the post-it note trend as a very organic form of public art.

“The one we have here is different because we ask for very poignant questions that help lead people through this feeling of what are we going to do? What now?” George Cominskie, president of the Westbeth Artists Residents Council, told Metro.

READ MORE HERE: METRO NEWS

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