Category Archives: Lead Excerpts

Strange-Flowers_web_800 REVISED

STRANGE FLOWERS

Strange-Flowers_web_800 REVISED

Artists
Cecile Chong, Elisabeth Condon, Nancy Friedemann, Brece Honeycutt, Amy Lincoln, Judith Linhares, Rebecca Saylor Sack, Chrysanne Stathacos, Jessica Weiss, Jimmy Wright

Organized by Elisabeth Condon
elisabethcondon@gmail.com
917.449.4483

Exhibition Poster: Jessica Weiss GENIE 2014 (detail) Silkscreen, acrylic and collage on canvas 70 x 68 inches

Westbeth Gallery
55 Bethune St. at Washington St., New York, NY 10014
westbethgallery@gmail.com

Exhibition Dates: September 9 – September 30, 2017
Gallery Hours: Wednesday – Sunday 1 – 6 PM

Opening Reception: Saturday, September 9, 6 PM to 8 PM
Gallery Walk-Through with Selected Artists 4:30 – 5:30 PM
(Chong, Honeycutt, Lincoln, Linhares , Sack and Weiss)

Exhibition Statement

In the art and fashion worlds this season, flowers bloom in gallery and museum exhibitions and flourish in upscale window displays, pop-up shop exteriors and a myriad of high-end products from handbags to vases.

Yet beneath their decorative veneer flowers possess a strange morbidity. The desire to encapsulate their beautiful forms is to contain that which cannot be controlled. Michel Houellebecq jokes in The Map and The Territory ( 2010. p17-18) that “the flower’s will to live manifests itself in the dazzling spots of color which break the greenish banalty of the urban landscap, as well as the generally transparent banality of the urban landscape–or at least in municipalities in bloom.” A long-standing custom of sending flowers in the event of illness and death persists. Sadie Stein observes of Childe Hassam’s painting “The Room of Flowers,” 1894, that documents poet Celia Thaxter’s room the year of her demise, that the flowers depicted symbolically replace Thaxter’s body after her death.[1]

Strange Flowers considers what flowers symbolize to artists working with flowers today and who have worked with them a while. What compels artists to utilize flowers? How do flowers function as image, form or structure for each artist, and in a larger context help navigate life? How can frail flowers combat global instability, terror, falsity? Do flowers’ reminder of life’s fleeting beauty inspire artists, or in fact do they perceive flowers as beautiful at all?

[1] Stein, Sadie. On the Island of The Shoals with Celia Thaxter. Paris Review, February 4, 2016.

Nancy Friedemann CORNUCOPIA 2016 India Ink on Tyvek  225 x 108 inches

Nancy Friedemann CORNUCOPIA 2016 India Ink on Tyvek 225 x 108 inches

Artist Links:

Cecile Chong, NY, NY
http://cecilechong.com

Elisabeth Condon, NY, NY
http://elisabethcondon.com

Nancy Friedemann-Sanchez, Brooklyn, NY – Nebraska
http://www.nancyfriedemann.com/chapter-2/1

Brece Honeycutt, Sheffield, MA
http://brecehoneycutt.com

Amy Lincoln, Brooklyn, NY
http://amylincoln.com/paintings/1

Judith Linhares, Brooklyn, NY
http://www.judithlinhares.com/Gouache_BlueVase.html

Rebecca Saylor Sack, Philadelphia, PA
http://rebeccasaylorsack.net

Chrysanne Stathacos, Toronto, Athens
http://chrysannestathacos.com

Jessica Weiss, Brooklyn, NY
http://jessicaweiss.net

Jimmy Wright, NY, NY
http://www.jimmywrightartist.com/works/

Bruce Honeycutt FLASHCARDS:WILDFLOWERS 2016 ecoprint on paper, child's slate, vintage flash cards  73 x 24 x 8 inches

Bruce Honeycutt FLASHCARDS:WILDFLOWERS 2016 ecoprint on paper, child’s slate, vintage flash cards 73 x 24 x 8 inches

Cecile Chong DETAIL: WORK IN PROGRESS FOR STRANGE FLOWERS 2017 Flowers, foam paint. Dimensions variable

Cecile Chong WORK IN PROGRESS FOR STRANGE FLOWERS 2017 (detail) Flowers, foam paint. Dimensions variable

PowerPoint Presentation

THE FIBER MATRIX
Quilters of Color Network New York
and special guests

PowerPoint Presentation

Show Dates: October 7 to October 29, 2017
Opening Reception:
Saturday October 7 from 2pm to 6pm

Gallery Hours:
Wednesday – Sunday
1pm – 6pm

The Fiber Matrix is a
collection of works that represent the versatility of textiles and the myriad of ways they can be used to create objects of utility, works of art and pedagogical instruments and facilitate thought provoking dialogue about a variety of contemporary
and historical topics.

The exhibit illustrates an awareness of how our socio-political landscape can be interpreted in the context of a textile installation, in the same way these themes are expressed in traditional fine art.

Curator: William Daniels

Artists:

Aleeda Crawley
Anjean Carter
Antonia Manuela
Barbara Fridie
Barbara Mims
Betty Robertson
Brenda Harris
Cassandra Knight
Delores Frazier
Diane Collier
Diane Pryor-Holland
Edward Bostick
Eleanor Williams
Frieda Hoyett
Jackquelynn Jones
Jacqueline Johnson
Karen Haynes
Kenny Johnson
Kim Hall
Margaret Simmons
Marilyn Hamilton
Minnie Curry
Sandi Howell
Sandra Samaniego
Shelia Bligen
Thadine Wormly-Herndon
Wendy Higginbotham

Guest Exhibitors:
Frank Sabatte
Philistine Lawson
Robert L. Herndon

BUNKIN MORONI TALK

Robert Bunkin: An Illustrated Talk on
Giovanni Battista Moroni

BUNKIN MORONI TALK

Giovanni Battista Moroni (ca. 1523-1579) is known among cognoscenti of Renaissance painting, but is relatively little-known compared to such masters as Titian and Raphael.

He painted superb, and uncannily modern-looking portraits of the people in his community: nobility, ecclesiasts, officials, intellectuals and merchants, including the earliest portrait of a skilled tradesman, Moroni’s famous Portrait of a Tailor in London’s National Gallery.

Despite his limited renown, his work can be found in most of the major art museums of the world, including about 22 works in American museums (the Metropolitan Museum owns 3). His reputation has recently soared, due to an historic exhibition at London’s Royal Academy in 2015. Plans are now afoot for the first NYC solo show of his work at the Frick Collection in 2019.

Robert Bunkin, former Curator of Art at the Staten Island Museum and figurative painter, has studied Moroni’s work in depth for over 40 years. He has traveled to see most of Moroni’s paintings, and will have recently returned from a visit to Moroni’s cities: Bergamo and Albino, having met with Dr. Simone Facchinetti, the scholar of Moroni who is currently preparing a new catalogue of Moroni’s complete works. Dr. Facchinetti, Director of the Adriano Bernareggi Museum of Sacred Art in Bergamo, has curated numerous exhibitions about Moroni in the past two decades (including the Royal Academy show, co-curated with Arturo Galansino). The publication of Dr. Facchinetti’s catalogue is planned to coincide with the Moroni exhibition at the Frick Collection.

Mr. Bunkin’s talk will be profusely illustrated with works primarily in American Museums. He will also address Moroni’s influence on later artists, such as Van Dyck, Velazquez, Kauffman, Reynolds, Whistler, and Cassatt.

A Free event sponsored by Westbeth Artists Residents Council

Penny Jones Puppets Oct 1

PEPPI AND THE POP UP DRAGON Penny Jones & Co Puppets
Early Childhood Theater

Penny Jones Puppets Oct 1

The new season of Penny Jones & Puppets Early Childhood Theater begins!

Sunday, October 1, 2017 at 11 AM & 2:30 PM

Peppi and the Pop-Up Dragon
A puppet show inside a giant 12-foot pop-up book with the audience creating the sounds and songs.
The sun rises and sets over a happy fishing village with bells that ring, babies who are rocked and boats that go out to sea. But the town is threatened by the pop-up dragon from the Blue Mountain. How will Peppi save the day?

With a special Dragon making mini-workshop after the show

Preview

Reviews
“ The townspeople were alarmed. How would they survive? (talk about problem solving and cooperation!) They solved the problem, but you’d have to see this remarkable show to find out how. What a pleasurable experience. All I heard after this performance was “How charming!”
-Puppet Master, Puppetry Guild of Greater New York

“It succinctly reminded me of what a wealth of resources we have in children’s theatre….charming”
-Puppeteers of America Puppetry Journal

“Very simple, and perfect as an introduction to theatre.”
-New York Magazine

“Charming.”
-The New York Times

Performed at the Henson International Festival at the Public Theater

Tickets on sale at pennypuppets.org and Eventbrite
or CASH ONLY at the door starting 20 minutes before the show
Tickets are $10 for all ages
Show Times: 11 AM & 2:30 PM
All Ages – Great for 3 to 8

Address: Westbeth Community Room
155 Bank Street between Washington and West Streets
Enter through courtyard
Stroller Parking
Shows Run about 45 Minutes
Information: (212) 924-0525

http://www.pennypuppets.org

BUS AND SUBWAY: M14A, M11, M20, (2 blocks)
A, C, E, L, 1, 2, 3 (5 or 6 blocks)

Microsoft Word -  PAUL FINALLY .docx

Paul Muranyi WEATHER EVENTS 3

Microsoft Word -  PAUL FINALLY .docx

Painter Paul Muranyi is a Manhattan based artist who grew up in Westbeth Artists Housing. Both parents were artists his father a Jazz Musician and mother a fine arts painter/teacher. It was a common event in his house hold for him to play catch with Louis Armstrong and borrow his mother’s paints to create artwork and displayed proudly in the apt.
D06E2141-7480-42CC-B238-F23703DB4FF1 Paul’s interest in his current series reflects his long- time curiosity of dramatic events. Paul’s earlier career as a heavy metal guitar player performing predominantly in the East Village and eventually transitioned to a quest for a more stable life as he joined Westbeth Artist painter Karen Santry in her company the High -Tech Design Loft.
2EC3E3DE-33A0-42CE-AF08-5D083A8D5711Paul began experimenting with the computer parts and bright phone wires and plastic shapes working on 3-D collages. He began his studies at the School of Visual Arts resulting in his BFA in painting and had his first how with colleague Karen Young in the Westbeth Gallery. He has shown in over 28 galleries in group exhibitions throughout Manhattan and Florida.
B150EE99-B5B7-49D2-A5F5-D58D12BC458APaul’s current show in the Westbeth Hallway Gallery celebrates his third production of small and large oil painting series: Weather Events 3. His choice of only the most dramatic events in weather depict arresting combinations of moody lighting featuring lightening, tornadoes, icebergs, starlight evenings with coincidental sightings of shooting stars, comets or aurora borealis. Paul Muranyi evokes a sense of charged mystery and beauty through his combinations which manipulate an adroitly intuitive balance between realism and abstraction- taking the viewer through the familiar and the unknown.

erica-fae-screening

Film Screening TO KEEP THE LIGHT, created, directed and starring Erica Fae

erica-fae-screening

Inspired by true stories, a lighthouse keeper’s wife struggles with her work and her sanity as she cares for her sick husband in 19th century Maine. When a mysterious stranger washes up on shore, secrets buried in deep waters come to light, and she confronts both her past and her future.

Erica Fae graduated from New York University/Tisch School. Erica creates and produces original work, often from historical research. Her recent play “Take What Is Yours” (in which she stars, and co-wrote) received a Critics’ Pick in The New York Times and Backstage (2012). She appears in Lisa Robinson’s ground breaking short “Hollow”, premiering at Tribeca Film Festival (2013). She has won awards for Best Actress and Best Short for her short films, and has performed at New York Theatre Workshop, The Kennedy Center, Walker Arts Center, American Repertory Theatre, The New Victory, A.C.T., and Robert Wilson’s Watermill Center, and Dance Theater Workshop. Erica teaches physical acting at Yale School of Drama and The New School’s MFA programs. She lives at Westbeth.

More info at: To Keep The Light.com

REVIEW from SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN: “… a gripping portrait… wonderfully mysterious… Fae’s Abbie is an entrancing blend of delicacy and strength, and the cinematography is just stunning.”

REVIEW from NASHVILLE SCENE: “women dominate this year’s NEW DIRECTORS category… TO KEEP THE LIGHT, erica fae’s slow-burning period drama, follows salt-of-the-earth abbie, who is tasked with tending to a lighthouse on a remote maine island during her husband’s illness. fae, who also stars in the film, has garnered praise for her work in theater, and it shows: she reveals her character through exacting body language that makes her situation visceral. inspired by true stories of women lighthouse keepers in the 1800s, TO KEEP THE LIGHT is beautifully shot, building tension against the harsh landscape, and fae proves to be a true new talent.”

TO KEEP THE LIGHT wins BEST OF SHOW: “… a unique film with a fascinating heroine who is as sturdy and distinctive as the maine coastline where the story takes place…”

REVIEW from the ORLANDO WEEKLY:

“first-time writer-director erica fae’s TO KEEP THE LIGHT is a quietly mesmerizing look at the lonely life of a lighthouse keeper’s wife who is struggling with her daily duties – and her sanity – while caring for her sick husband in 19th-century maine. when a mysterious stranger washes up on shore, she is forced to confront both her past and her future. shot much like a haunted-house thriller, the film takes on an ingmar bergman feel in the second half… its beauty and confidently methodical pacing – not to mention a solid performance by fae herself – make it one of the better offerings in the narrative features competition… captures the feel of the period and… features an interesting feminist theme.”

REVIEW from cinema365:

“every shot here is literally a work of art; this movie is like strolling through a museum where one great painting after another hangs on the wall… while this is her first feature film- with work like this, I sincerely hope ms. fae continues her work in the cinematic arts… fae gives the character an inner core that is stronger than steel and grabs the viewer’s attention and admiration. she may be one of the most memorable female characters you’ll see in any movie this year and you certainly won’t be forgetting any time soon after the credits roll…. an early candidate for my top films of 2016.”

REVIEW from THE MANEATER: “…a work of art and surreal beauty, this film is a must-watch because it throws light on obscured aspects of our history and imparts a valuable lesson of taking a stand for what is ours.”

FROM THE COLUMBIA TRIBUNE: ”… weds stunning visuals to the compelling story of a lighthouse keeper’s wife trying to care for her husband, their hime and herself…”

FIPRECI PRIZE ANNOUNCEMENT IN GERMAN PRESS

REVIEW from WILLAMETTE WEEK:

seven new movies to see this week: what to watch in portland (oregon) cinemas

“abbie is the wife of an ailing lighthouse keeper on an isolated island off the coast of 1867 maine. when a stranger washes up on her shore, she’s forced to confront her life and desires. based on the approximately 300 women who served as lighthouse attendants in the 1800s, this film offers a glimpse into the lives of often forgotten heroines…”

from WOMEN IN FILM & TV VANCOUVER:

“fae’s film displays a gift for both masterful composition and mesmerizing drama as she imparts this involving story of an embattled woman relegated to the fringes of society but determined to be respected.”

write-now-poster-dec-2016

WRITE NOW
A Participatory Installation
December 10 – 31, 2016

write-now-poster-dec-2016

Our world seems to be in upheaval. People are looking for some way to express their concerns and hope for the future. “WRITE NOW” will give them the opportunity to express those feelings in the Westbeth Gallery.

How the show works: Upon entry into the gallery, the participant is asked to donate a $1 or more to canisters representing 5 locally-based New York charities
Planned Parenthood NYAli Forney CenterGod’s Love We DeliverCabrini Immigrant ServicesThe Alliance for Greater NY

Visitors will use as many post- it notes as they want to express their thoughts about 2016 and their hopes for 2017.

You can draw, collage, paint, write, and sculpt.

Main Room : What Do You Want the World to Bring into 2017?

Rear Room: What Do You Want the World to Leave in 2016?


Side Room 1 : What Do You Want to Bring into 2017?

Small Side 2 Want to Leave in 2016?

We will have a “Westbeth Only Preview Night” on Dec 9th. All Westbeth residents will be invited to post their notes that evening. The Public Opening will occur on Dec 10th. The show will run through Dec 31st.

PORTRAIT Studio,alexbailey'sjuneandjuly15_SCoffey_email

The Portrait Project:
Artists portraying Artists

PORTRAIT Studio,alexbailey'sjuneandjuly15_SCoffey_email

The Portrait Project: Artists Portraying Artists
A group exhibition of 17 painters and sculptors. Each artist will include in their exhibited body of work, at least one portrait of another artist in the show.

Exhibition Dates:
May 6 – May 20, 2017

Opening Reception:
Saturday May 6, 5 – 8 PM

Gallery Hours:
Wednesdays – Sundays,
1PM – 6PM

Westbeth Gallery presents the Portrait Project, an association of artists using direct observation, who exchange modeling time with one another. The modeling exchange provides a creative stimulus and exposes each artist to divergent points of view about portraiture and different working practices, avoiding many compromises associated with commissions. The show will highlight a body of work from each of the members. At least one of the pieces from each artist will be a portrait of a fellow Portrait Project member. Media include painting, drawing and sculpture.

Participating artists:
Alix Bailey, Robert Bunkin, Susanna Coffey, ColleenFranca, Leonid Gervits, Valerie Gillett, Howard Gladstone, Yuka Imata, Karen Kaapcke, Eric March,Frances Middendorf,J. William Middendorf, Sharon Moreau,Dena Schutzer, Orly Shiv,Donna Skebo, and Clarissa Payne Uvegi.

Special Evvents:
Drawing Room: An on-going feature of the exhibition will be the Drawing Room, which will display member’s drawings, as well as provide an opportunity for visitors to draw themselves or another visitor, in a space furnished with pencil and paper, chairs and a mirror. Visitor drawings can be displayed in the room until the conclusion of the exhibition, and retrieved on the closing day (May 20 no later than 6PM).

Panel discussion: “Artists Portraying Artists” on Saturday, May 13, 4 – 5:30 PM
Panel includes David Cohen, Mel Leipzig, Gail Levin, and Jennifer Samet.

“Roundtable” conversation on Saturday, May 20 (closing day), 3 – 5 PM. Attendees are invited to participate in an open discussion about issues in contemporary portraiture with Portrait Project members.

Westbeth Gallery
55 Bethune Street, Atrium
New York, NY 10014
westbethgallery@gmail.com
Contact: Howard Gladstone, 646-391-4821