Category Archives: Upcoming Events

Pamela Boily LAKESIDE

THINKING BIG
Artists of Blue Mountain Gallery

Pamela Boily LAKESIDE

Pamela Boily LAKESIDE

Dates: November 2 – 25, 2017

Hours Open: Wednesday – Sunday, 12 – 6 PM

Opening Reception: Sunday November 5, 3 – 5 PM with music by The First Street Quintet

Walk Around with Artists: Saturday November 11, 2 – 4 PM

Closing Reception: Saturday November 25, 4 – 6 PM

Thinking Big addresses the significance of both the physical and psychological impact of an artwork’s size in relation to its thematic concerns. Forty one gallery artists are included in this dynamic exhibition of paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture.

The accompanying online catalogue, available in late October, includes each artist’s thoughtful statements on the theme of bigness and an introductory essay by the critic Xico Greenwald.

This show serves as a reminder of the important role played by artist-run cooperatives over the past half century and builds on the recent interest in these galleries generated by the widely acclaimed exhibit “Inventing Downtown” at NYU’s Grey Gallery. Blue Mountain Gallery opened in 1980 as Soho was emerging as an art epicenter. Now located in the heart of Chelsea, its history and continuity form an important contribution to New York’s art world.

Participants:
Download pdf here about artists and their statements: THINKING BIG artists-statements-sept-13

Mary Lou Alberetti
Robert Alberetti
Gulgun Aliriza
Doug Anderson
Theresa Bartol
Nancy Beal
Pamela Berkeley
Leslie K. Brill
Richard Castellana
Michael Chelminski
Marcia Clark
Anne Diggory
Ken Ecker
Judith Evans

Sharyn Finnegan
Owen Grey
Margaret Grimes
Carol Heft
Marilyn Honigman
Sam Jungkurth
Charles Kalman
Joan Marie Kelly
Marjorie Kramer
John Leavey
Margaret Leveson
Helene Manzo
Richard Kirk Mills
Alakananda Mulkerji
Janie Paul
Erica Prud’homme
Janie Paul
Nancy Prusinowski
Tim Ross
Victoria Salzman
Gina Sawin
Janet Sawyer
Linda Smith
Sam Thurston
Jennifer Toth
Marie Van Elder
Rose Weinstock
Jeanie Wing

Curatorial Committee:

Marcia Clark, Anne Diggory, Sharyn Finnegan, Margaret Grimes, Margaret Leveson, Helene Manzo, Alakananda Mukerji

Strange-Flowers_web_800 REVISED

STRANGE FLOWERS

Strange-Flowers_web_800 REVISED

Artists
Cecile Chong, Elisabeth Condon, Nancy Friedemann, Brece Honeycutt, Amy Lincoln, Judith Linhares, Rebecca Saylor Sack, Chrysanne Stathacos, Jessica Weiss, Jimmy Wright

Organized by Elisabeth Condon
elisabethcondon@gmail.com
917.449.4483

Exhibition Poster: Jessica Weiss GENIE 2014 (detail) Silkscreen, acrylic and collage on canvas 70 x 68 inches

Westbeth Gallery
55 Bethune St. at Washington St., New York, NY 10014
westbethgallery@gmail.com

Exhibition Dates: September 9 – September 30, 2017
Gallery Hours: Wednesday – Sunday 1 – 6 PM

Opening Reception: Saturday, September 9, 6 PM to 8 PM
Gallery Walk-Through with Selected Artists 4:30 – 5:30 PM
(Chong, Honeycutt, Lincoln, Linhares , Sack and Weiss)

Exhibition Statement

In the art and fashion worlds this season, flowers bloom in gallery and museum exhibitions and flourish in upscale window displays, pop-up shop exteriors and a myriad of high-end products from handbags to vases.

Yet beneath their decorative veneer flowers possess a strange morbidity. The desire to encapsulate their beautiful forms is to contain that which cannot be controlled. Michel Houellebecq jokes in The Map and The Territory ( 2010. p17-18) that “the flower’s will to live manifests itself in the dazzling spots of color which break the greenish banalty of the urban landscap, as well as the generally transparent banality of the urban landscape–or at least in municipalities in bloom.” A long-standing custom of sending flowers in the event of illness and death persists. Sadie Stein observes of Childe Hassam’s painting “The Room of Flowers,” 1894, that documents poet Celia Thaxter’s room the year of her demise, that the flowers depicted symbolically replace Thaxter’s body after her death.[1]

Strange Flowers considers what flowers symbolize to artists working with flowers today and who have worked with them a while. What compels artists to utilize flowers? How do flowers function as image, form or structure for each artist, and in a larger context help navigate life? How can frail flowers combat global instability, terror, falsity? Do flowers’ reminder of life’s fleeting beauty inspire artists, or in fact do they perceive flowers as beautiful at all?

[1] Stein, Sadie. On the Island of The Shoals with Celia Thaxter. Paris Review, February 4, 2016.

Nancy Friedemann CORNUCOPIA 2016 India Ink on Tyvek  225 x 108 inches

Nancy Friedemann CORNUCOPIA 2016 India Ink on Tyvek 225 x 108 inches

Artist Links:

Cecile Chong, NY, NY
http://cecilechong.com

Elisabeth Condon, NY, NY
http://elisabethcondon.com

Nancy Friedemann-Sanchez, Brooklyn, NY – Nebraska
http://www.nancyfriedemann.com/chapter-2/1

Brece Honeycutt, Sheffield, MA
http://brecehoneycutt.com

Amy Lincoln, Brooklyn, NY
http://amylincoln.com/paintings/1

Judith Linhares, Brooklyn, NY
http://www.judithlinhares.com/Gouache_BlueVase.html

Rebecca Saylor Sack, Philadelphia, PA
http://rebeccasaylorsack.net

Chrysanne Stathacos, Toronto, Athens
http://chrysannestathacos.com

Jessica Weiss, Brooklyn, NY
http://jessicaweiss.net

Jimmy Wright, NY, NY
http://www.jimmywrightartist.com/works/

Bruce Honeycutt FLASHCARDS:WILDFLOWERS 2016 ecoprint on paper, child's slate, vintage flash cards  73 x 24 x 8 inches

Bruce Honeycutt FLASHCARDS:WILDFLOWERS 2016 ecoprint on paper, child’s slate, vintage flash cards 73 x 24 x 8 inches

Cecile Chong DETAIL: WORK IN PROGRESS FOR STRANGE FLOWERS 2017 Flowers, foam paint. Dimensions variable

Cecile Chong WORK IN PROGRESS FOR STRANGE FLOWERS 2017 (detail) Flowers, foam paint. Dimensions variable

Penny Jones Puppets Oct 1

PEPPI AND THE POP UP DRAGON Penny Jones & Co Puppets
Early Childhood Theater

Penny Jones Puppets Oct 1

The new season of Penny Jones & Puppets Early Childhood Theater begins!

Sunday, October 1, 2017 at 11 AM & 2:30 PM

Peppi and the Pop-Up Dragon
A puppet show inside a giant 12-foot pop-up book with the audience creating the sounds and songs.
The sun rises and sets over a happy fishing village with bells that ring, babies who are rocked and boats that go out to sea. But the town is threatened by the pop-up dragon from the Blue Mountain. How will Peppi save the day?

With a special Dragon making mini-workshop after the show

Preview

Reviews
“ The townspeople were alarmed. How would they survive? (talk about problem solving and cooperation!) They solved the problem, but you’d have to see this remarkable show to find out how. What a pleasurable experience. All I heard after this performance was “How charming!”
-Puppet Master, Puppetry Guild of Greater New York

“It succinctly reminded me of what a wealth of resources we have in children’s theatre….charming”
-Puppeteers of America Puppetry Journal

“Very simple, and perfect as an introduction to theatre.”
-New York Magazine

“Charming.”
-The New York Times

Performed at the Henson International Festival at the Public Theater

Tickets on sale at pennypuppets.org and Eventbrite
or CASH ONLY at the door starting 20 minutes before the show
Tickets are $10 for all ages
Show Times: 11 AM & 2:30 PM
All Ages – Great for 3 to 8

Address: Westbeth Community Room
155 Bank Street between Washington and West Streets
Enter through courtyard
Stroller Parking
Shows Run about 45 Minutes
Information: (212) 924-0525

http://www.pennypuppets.org

BUS AND SUBWAY: M14A, M11, M20, (2 blocks)
A, C, E, L, 1, 2, 3 (5 or 6 blocks)

MUTATION SHOW

THE MUTATION SHOW A Film Screening

MUTATION SHOW

A film screening of the 1973 Open Theater production, directed by Joe Chaikin

Performance by The Open Theater, directed by Joseph Chaikin, a fluid montage of scenes, ideas and personalities, mostly created by the actors themselves in rehearsal, called “the mutation show.” With Joseph Chaikin, Raymond Barry, Shami Chaikin, Tina Shepard, Paul Zimet, Ellen Maddow, Tom Lillard, Jo Ann Schidman, presenting such characters as the tinker, the petrified man, the bird lady, the man who smiles, and the man who hits himself, a boy in a box, the animal girl, the ringmaster. Often the “language” is sound without dialogue. Often the “plot” refers to primal processes like learning to walk, learning civilization. At the conclusion each actor introduces himself/herself and gives background, biography, description of family, hair, eyes, etc. Each actor holds an early picture of himself. 1973.”