Category Archives: Upcoming Events

Strange-Flowers_web_800 REVISED

STRANGE FLOWERS

Strange-Flowers_web_800 REVISED

Artists
Cecile Chong, Elisabeth Condon, Nancy Friedemann, Brece Honeycutt, Amy Lincoln, Judith Linhares, Rebecca Saylor Sack, Chrysanne Stathacos, Jessica Weiss, Jimmy Wright

Organized by Elisabeth Condon
elisabethcondon@gmail.com
917.449.4483

Exhibition Poster: Jessica Weiss GENIE 2014 (detail) Silkscreen, acrylic and collage on canvas 70 x 68 inches

Westbeth Gallery
55 Bethune St. at Washington St., New York, NY 10014
westbethgallery@gmail.com

Exhibition Dates: September 9 – September 30, 2017
Gallery Hours: Wednesday – Sunday 1 – 6 PM

Opening Reception: Saturday, September 9, 6 PM to 8 PM
Gallery Walk-Through with Selected Artists 4:30 – 5:30 PM
(Chong, Honeycutt, Lincoln, Linhares , Sack and Weiss)

Exhibition Statement

In the art and fashion worlds this season, flowers bloom in gallery and museum exhibitions and flourish in upscale window displays, pop-up shop exteriors and a myriad of high-end products from handbags to vases.

Yet beneath their decorative veneer flowers possess a strange morbidity. The desire to encapsulate their beautiful forms is to contain that which cannot be controlled. Michel Houellebecq jokes in The Map and The Territory ( 2010. p17-18) that “the flower’s will to live manifests itself in the dazzling spots of color which break the greenish banalty of the urban landscap, as well as the generally transparent banality of the urban landscape–or at least in municipalities in bloom.” A long-standing custom of sending flowers in the event of illness and death persists. Sadie Stein observes of Childe Hassam’s painting “The Room of Flowers,” 1894, that documents poet Celia Thaxter’s room the year of her demise, that the flowers depicted symbolically replace Thaxter’s body after her death.[1]

Strange Flowers considers what flowers symbolize to artists working with flowers today and who have worked with them a while. What compels artists to utilize flowers? How do flowers function as image, form or structure for each artist, and in a larger context help navigate life? How can frail flowers combat global instability, terror, falsity? Do flowers’ reminder of life’s fleeting beauty inspire artists, or in fact do they perceive flowers as beautiful at all?

[1] Stein, Sadie. On the Island of The Shoals with Celia Thaxter. Paris Review, February 4, 2016.

Nancy Friedemann CORNUCOPIA 2016 India Ink on Tyvek  225 x 108 inches

Nancy Friedemann CORNUCOPIA 2016 India Ink on Tyvek 225 x 108 inches

Artist Links:

Cecile Chong, NY, NY
http://cecilechong.com

Elisabeth Condon, NY, NY
http://elisabethcondon.com

Nancy Friedemann-Sanchez, Brooklyn, NY – Nebraska
http://www.nancyfriedemann.com/chapter-2/1

Brece Honeycutt, Sheffield, MA
http://brecehoneycutt.com

Amy Lincoln, Brooklyn, NY
http://amylincoln.com/paintings/1

Judith Linhares, Brooklyn, NY
http://www.judithlinhares.com/Gouache_BlueVase.html

Rebecca Saylor Sack, Philadelphia, PA
http://rebeccasaylorsack.net

Chrysanne Stathacos, Toronto, Athens
http://chrysannestathacos.com

Jessica Weiss, Brooklyn, NY
http://jessicaweiss.net

Jimmy Wright, NY, NY
http://www.jimmywrightartist.com/works/

Bruce Honeycutt FLASHCARDS:WILDFLOWERS 2016 ecoprint on paper, child's slate, vintage flash cards  73 x 24 x 8 inches

Bruce Honeycutt FLASHCARDS:WILDFLOWERS 2016 ecoprint on paper, child’s slate, vintage flash cards 73 x 24 x 8 inches

Cecile Chong DETAIL: WORK IN PROGRESS FOR STRANGE FLOWERS 2017 Flowers, foam paint. Dimensions variable

Cecile Chong WORK IN PROGRESS FOR STRANGE FLOWERS 2017 (detail) Flowers, foam paint. Dimensions variable

Discursive_Selves_Poster

DISCURSIVE SELVES

Discursive_Selves_Poster

July 21 – August 11, 2017
Wednesday – Sunday
12pm – 7pm

Discursive Selves explores the contested meaning of the Self Portrait. This collection of photography and film by eleven contemporary artists reveals nuanced definitions of selfhood that acknowledge the influence of one’s social environment on one’s inner sense of identity. These artists use the camera to navigate between both fluid and fixed perceptions of the Self, and are thus able to present who they are on their own terms.

The Self Portrait plays an essential role in the development and establishment of one’s identity— it informs and is informed, creates and is created, is both concrete and ephemeral. For some, it manifests as an artifact, a material body, or a form of testimony; for others, it is a projection, a speculation, or a performance. Working in a new genre of critical photography, these artists play with the paradox of “public intimacy” to explore the relationship between private life and public persona. Portrayals of the Self range from fictitious characters and imagined scenarios to biological self-studies or familial ties.

Discursive Selves dissects the myriad practices of formulating oneself as both an intimate ritual and a method of responding to one’s outer world. In a rapidly expanding global information society, this exhibition invites a moment of pause for contemplation in contemporary life.

Artists
Farah Al Qasimi
Aneta Bartos
Nicolas Bloise
Elliott Jerome Brown Jr.
Nona Faustine
Rindon Johnson
Tommy Kha
Pixy Liao
Matthew Morrocco
Bryson Rand
Paul Mpagi Sepuya

Curated by Eric Lawton & Daphne Takahashi

Westbeth Gallery
55 Bethune St
New York, NY 10014

This exhibition is made possible through the support of Art + Commerce

MUTATION SHOW

THE MUTATION SHOW A Film Screening

MUTATION SHOW

A film screening of the 1973 Open Theater production, directed by Joe Chaikin

Performance by The Open Theater, directed by Joseph Chaikin, a fluid montage of scenes, ideas and personalities, mostly created by the actors themselves in rehearsal, called “the mutation show.” With Joseph Chaikin, Raymond Barry, Shami Chaikin, Tina Shepard, Paul Zimet, Ellen Maddow, Tom Lillard, Jo Ann Schidman, presenting such characters as the tinker, the petrified man, the bird lady, the man who smiles, and the man who hits himself, a boy in a box, the animal girl, the ringmaster. Often the “language” is sound without dialogue. Often the “plot” refers to primal processes like learning to walk, learning civilization. At the conclusion each actor introduces himself/herself and gives background, biography, description of family, hair, eyes, etc. Each actor holds an early picture of himself. 1973.”