Category Archives: Upcoming Events

write-now-poster-dec-2016

WRITE NOW
A Participatory Installation
December 10 – 31, 2016

write-now-poster-dec-2016

Our world seems to be in upheaval. People are looking for some way to express their concerns and hope for the future. “WRITE NOW” will give them the opportunity to express those feelings in the Westbeth Gallery.

How the show works: Upon entry into the gallery, the participant is asked to donate a $1 or more to canisters representing 5 locally-based New York charities
Planned Parenthood NYAli Forney CenterGod’s Love We DeliverCabrini Immigrant ServicesThe Alliance for Greater NY

Visitors will use as many post- it notes as they want to express their thoughts about 2016 and their hopes for 2017.

You can draw, collage, paint, write, and sculpt.

Main Room : What Do You Want the World to Bring into 2017?

Rear Room: What Do You Want the World to Leave in 2016?


Side Room 1 : What Do You Want to Bring into 2017?

Small Side 2 Want to Leave in 2016?

We will have a “Westbeth Only Preview Night” on Dec 9th. All Westbeth residents will be invited to post their notes that evening. The Public Opening will occur on Dec 10th. The show will run through Dec 31st.

whitney-staff-art-show

FROM INSIDE THE WHITNEY
STAFF ART SHOW 2017

whitney-staff-art-show

From its origins in Greenwich Village in 1914 to its relocation to the Meatpacking District in 2015, the Whitney Museum of American Art has remained devoted to living artists at critical moments in their careers. Many of the Museum’s staff members, who provide crucial support to the development, implementation, and management of exhibitions, programs, and publications, are artists themselves. For the first time, the Whitney’s Staff Art Show will be held in a public space, offering staff an opportunity to share their work with a broad public and deepen connections with the Museum’s new surrounding community. This exhibition will display over 50 works in a wide range of mediums, including painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, watercolor, collage, and video, reflecting the diversity of artistic practice among the Whitney’s talented staff.

Participating Artists

David J Armacost
James Bartolacci
Mishele Begun
Caitlin Bermingham
Richard Bloes
Ali Bono
Chris Burton
Natalee Cayton
Jacqueline Cedar
Kiran Chandra
Ramon Cintron
Heather Cox
Sarah Dinkelacker
John Donovan
Kasim Earl
Reid Farrington
Jesse Gelaznik
Claudia Gerbracht
Manuela Gonzalez
Sophie Grant
Dina Helal
Leslie Hodge
Chris Ketchie
Franky Kong
Tom Kotik
Chris Lesnewski
Rob Lomblad
Doug Madill
Pearl Malt
Jasa McKenzie
Nicole Melanson
Conor Messinger
David Miller
Maureen Millmore
Lorryn Moore
Victor Moscoso
Anthony Naimoli
Rose O’Neill-Suspitsyna
William Norton
Luis Padilla
Laurie Peruyero
Jason Phillips
Eliza Proctor
Greg Reynolds
Kristin Roeder
Justin Romeo
Joshua Rosenblatt
Isaiah Russell
Jay Sanders
Dyeemah Simmons
Mark Steigelman
Eric Vermilion
Butcher Walsh
Jenyu Wang
Nathaniel Whitfield
George Wisegarver
Passage to China

ALISON ARMSTRONG
OLD GOLD

Passage to China

Passage to China


Alison Armstrong
came to Westbeth Artist Housing in 1981 as a published author; since then she resumed her interest in painting and began to exhibit at Westbeth in 1989. A member of Japanese Artists Association of New York for more than ten years, she also exhibits annually at Tenri Gallery. Her art is held in private collections in England and North America . She has an M.Litt. from Oxford University and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from NYU, teaches writing and art history at School of Visual Arts and BMCC, and continues to speak and write about art and aesthetics as well as to make art.

ALison Armstrong Artist Statment for OLD GOLD EXHIBITION

This series of textured gold paintings arose from various interests. I have painted in other ways, including the use of Sumi-e, Japanese brush painting studied with my late Sensei, Koho Yamamoto. However, I also became interested in other forms.
Antique gold screens from the Meiji period, Russian orthodox religious icons, and gilt bronze used in 18th-early 19th century Federal style household furnishings are uses of gold as a reflecting method in interior spaces. The metal itself is very special in comparison with other precious metals. As a metaphor in literature and in museum collections I have pondered my attraction to the qualities of gold: ancient gold artifacts such as bronze age gold torques, earplugs, and other jewelry dug from the bronze age bogs in Ireland and similar objects found in bronze age Greek, Trojan, Persian, and Egyptian cultures and later in Rome and to our present day, all point to the special qualities of gold. Gold does not oxidize/rust/tarnish, gold is very heavy but soft enough to be beaten into feather-light gold leaf. It has the associations of the eternal, the perfect. When a sculptor friend gave me several pounds of steel dust from the floor of his studio, and a painter friend gave me a jar of marble dust, and then I began to collect quartz pebbles and sand from the beach, I experimented with thickening and texturing gold oil paint in order to enhance its reflective qualities and give it the depth and illusion of age.

–Alison Armstrong
Westbeth
October 1st 2016

MUTATION SHOW

THE MUTATION SHOW A Film Screening

MUTATION SHOW

A film screening of the 1973 Open Theater production, directed by Joe Chaikin

Performance by The Open Theater, directed by Joseph Chaikin, a fluid montage of scenes, ideas and personalities, mostly created by the actors themselves in rehearsal, called “the mutation show.” With Joseph Chaikin, Raymond Barry, Shami Chaikin, Tina Shepard, Paul Zimet, Ellen Maddow, Tom Lillard, Jo Ann Schidman, presenting such characters as the tinker, the petrified man, the bird lady, the man who smiles, and the man who hits himself, a boy in a box, the animal girl, the ringmaster. Often the “language” is sound without dialogue. Often the “plot” refers to primal processes like learning to walk, learning civilization. At the conclusion each actor introduces himself/herself and gives background, biography, description of family, hair, eyes, etc. Each actor holds an early picture of himself. 1973.”