Category Archives: Past Events

CHRISTINA AND CAROL

CHRISTINA MAILE and
CAROL HEBALD are the co-winners of the first annual Miriam Chaikin Endowment Fund Writing Award
READING April 12, 2017 at 7PM
Westbeth Community Room

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This award was established in memory of Miriam Chaikin, a longtime Westbeth resident and prolific writer. Born in Palestine, Chaikin grew up in Brooklyn, and her childhood memories and life in a close-knit Jewish community are all themes represented in her writing. She worked earlier in her career as an editor of literature for young people, and most of her books are intended for children and youth. Her works include lushly illustrated retellings of Old Testament lessons, humorous stories of the misadventures of “Molly and Yossi” (based on her childhood and that of her beloved younger brother Joseph), and collections of poetry. The last two books she completed were for adults – Jewish Wisdom for Daily Life, and Jerusalem: An Informal Autobiography of the City. For Miriam/Molly/Chickie as she was known, the written word and the book were essential to her life and wellbeing.

In her memory we honor a member of the writing community, especially those who live in Westbeth. The first annual Chaikin award will be presented on April 12, 2017 to two winners whose works resonated with the review panel – Carol Hebald and Christina Maile. Both writers captured our imaginations with very human stories, both with works set in exotic locales fraught with complex political and religious tensions.

Carol Hebald’s new book, A Warsaw Chronicle, is based on her experiences as a visiting academic in Warsaw at a time of great upheaval, as Poland experienced the imposition of martial law and threat of Soviet invasion due to the growing power of the Solidarity movement. In this politically-charged context, the American protagonist Karolina Heybald’s life becomes linked with her gifted student Marek, and complicated by her search for her long-lost Jewish relatives. The book will be published in March 2017.

Christina Maile submitted a series of short stories, half of which are in the manner of a memoire, while the others are set in Iran. Her characters are remarkably rich and developed for their presence on a few short pages, and her descriptions evoke all of the readers’ senses as she writes about a garden in an Iranian home, the texture of marshmallow fluff, the touch of scissors on hair during a haircut, or the sweetness of ripe fruit.
Carol and Christina will both read from their works at a celebration in the Westbeth Community Room on April 12th at 7 PM and all are invited to attend and share in their fine works.

CHRISTINA MAILE
With camera

Really I have gone from one thing to another. After studying Russian Medieval History in college, I co-founded the Westbeth Playwrights Feminist Collective, one of the first feminist theater groups in New York City – Wikipedia article. I became a landscape architect because I fell in love with drafting tools. Some of my designs were published in Landscape Architecture Magazine, among others. My essays on the philosophy of landscape appeared in the Canadian journal, On-Site.

On a vacation 20 years ago, I joined the Friday Night Painters, taught by Dan Rice, a second-generation abstract expressionist painter, and one of the finest painters I have ever known. His class met on Fridays. We are exhibiting at the Guilford Art Center in Connecticut in July 2017

I became a printmaker because there was a communal printmaking studio in Westbeth. In 2013, I received a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, and a Joan Mitchell Foundation Studio Grant. My print work is in the Elizabeth Sackler Collection of Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Musuem, NYC, as well as in various living rooms all over the USA.

Intermittently I have taken Karen Ludwig’s weekly writing workshops. She and the other workshop members – Diane Spodarek, Dawn DÁrcy, Joyce Aaron, Nancy Gabor, Shami Chaikin – are the most encouraging people a writer could ever have. Also pretty inspiring, are my writer friends Deb Lucke and Anja Murmann whose graphic novels and screenplays I am lucky enough to read ahead of everyone else.

That such an itinerant life would lead to this writing award from the Endowment points to the lives of Miriam and her family who were always ready to take a chance, and in so doing gave a lot of people a chance to be themselves.

I am never any good at readings. Still I will be giving one with Carol Hebald on April 12, 2017. She is truly a wonderful reader of her work. So if you come on the evening when we read, come to hear her. I might even ask her to read mine.

CAROL HEBALD

Carol Hebald      photo John Turner

Carol Hebald photo John Turner

A former Teaching and Writing Fellow in fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Carol Hebald received her MFA in 1971. Having taught creative writing at the university level for the next thirteen years, she resigned a tenured associate professorship in English at University of Kansas to write full time.

She has since published the novella collection, Three Blind Mice (Unicorn Press, 1989), the memoir, The Heart Too Long Suppressed (Northeastern University Press, 2001); and more recently four books of poetry: Delusion of Grandeur (2016), Colloquy (2015), Spinster by the Sea (2005), and Little Monologs (2004).

Co-winner with Christina Maile of the Miriam Chaikin Writing Award for her novel, A Warsaw Chronicle, forthcoming from Regal House Press on March 24th, she will be reading from it on Tuesday, March 28th at Cornelia Street Café at 6 p.m., and will share the podium with Christina at the Westbeth Community room on April 12th.

Carol is currently working on a play about Watergate heroine Martha Mitchell. Her website is: www.CarolHebald.com.

Sculptors Guild

CURRENTLY 80 : Celebrating 80 years of The Sculptors Guild

Sculptors Guild

Show Dates February 5 – February 24, 2017
Opening Reception: Sunday February 5h 1pm – 4pm
Closing Reception: Friday Febrary 24th 6pm-8pm

Gallery Hours: Wednesday – Sunday 1pm – 6pm

The Sculptors Guild celebrates its historic 80th anniversary with an exhibition curated by distinguished poet and critic John Yau at Westbeth Gallery in the West Village from February 5-24, 2017.

The Sculptors Guild is a collective of contemporary professional sculptors “…looking to have the freedom to make and show work within a community that supports and encourages their practices. A rare feat in a world full of the detritus of pop culture and commodity-driven creation”, writes Brienne Walsh, art critic and historian.

Curator, John Yau, will be curating signature works by current Sculptors Guild members alongside historical pieces from the Guild’s collection. Works by founding member Chaim Gross as well as pieces from the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation, including drawings by member Louise Nevelson will be exhibited.

The founding of Sculptors Guild in 1937 was a seminal event for modern sculpture in America. Its members were at the forefront of American Modernism especially in their openly expressed rejection of the staid conventions. The result was an esthetic paradigm shift that would have significant impact on the international art scene during the years of reconstruction following the global devastation of WWII.

The primary objectives of the founders as stated in an early exhibition catalogue were: “to unite sculptors of all progressive aesthetic tendencies into a vital organization in order to further the artistic integrity of sculpture and give it its rightful place in the cultural life of
this country.”

Sculptors Guild is a not-for-profit organization based in New York City with a professional membership of acclaimed international sculptors of diverse esthetics. Our mission is to promote, encourage, and serve as an advocate for sculpture and to make contemporary sculpture a relevant part of the cultural experience.

SCULPTORS GUILD INC FOUNDED IN 1937 is a 501c2 Artist Collective

For further info: contact sculptorsguild@gmail.com

write-now-metro-news

News about WRITE NOW:
A Participatory Installation

write-now-metro-news

NEW YORK 1
New Yorkers are getting another chance to “post” about their emotions — but in the real world instead of social media.
They’re writing post-it notes at a new installation at a West Village art gallery.

Visitors first choose to make a charitable donation, and then answer one of four questions looking back on the past year, or forward to the new one.

Those responses take the form of words or drawings on post-it notes, which then hang in the gallery.

Organizers say this event is also a reaction to the political landscape.

“A lot of people are very angry and also very concerned about what’s happening here and that we are in New York,” said Karin Batten, Director of the Westbeth Gallery. “We are very multi-cultural and diverse and we want to keep it that way.”

“Events like this are so important,” said Manhattan State Senator Brad Hoylman. “It’s cathartic, it’s participatory but it also points us, I think, in a very positive direction as we start the New Year.”

A similar display popped up at the Union Square subway station last month for people to vent about the Presidential election’s outcome.

The exhibit opened Saturday and runs until New Year’s Eve.

http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/arts/2016/12/11/west-village-art-gallery-lets-patrons–post–about-their-status-as-part-of-a-new-exhibit–write-now-.html

METRO NEWS December 1, 2016

Write Now exhibit at Westbeth makes the post-it note fad high-brow

By: Amanda Mikelberg

A new interactive art installation looks like a rip-off on the subway post-it note phenomenon, but it’s actually honoring it.

A West Village exhibit is taking a page from the fluttering layers of post-it notes scrawled with messages of hope and frustration that have cropped up in underground passageways around the city since the election.

The “Write Now” exhibit is adopting the zeitgeist — this apparent need among New Yorkers to both purposefully express their feelings and strengthen a sense of community — and is taking it a step further. It’s recognizing the post-it note trend as a very organic form of public art.

“The one we have here is different because we ask for very poignant questions that help lead people through this feeling of what are we going to do? What now?” George Cominskie, president of the Westbeth Artists Residents Council, told Metro.

READ MORE HERE: METRO NEWS

erica-fae-screening

Film Screening TO KEEP THE LIGHT, created, directed and starring Erica Fae

erica-fae-screening

Inspired by true stories, a lighthouse keeper’s wife struggles with her work and her sanity as she cares for her sick husband in 19th century Maine. When a mysterious stranger washes up on shore, secrets buried in deep waters come to light, and she confronts both her past and her future.

Erica Fae graduated from New York University/Tisch School. Erica creates and produces original work, often from historical research. Her recent play “Take What Is Yours” (in which she stars, and co-wrote) received a Critics’ Pick in The New York Times and Backstage (2012). She appears in Lisa Robinson’s ground breaking short “Hollow”, premiering at Tribeca Film Festival (2013). She has won awards for Best Actress and Best Short for her short films, and has performed at New York Theatre Workshop, The Kennedy Center, Walker Arts Center, American Repertory Theatre, The New Victory, A.C.T., and Robert Wilson’s Watermill Center, and Dance Theater Workshop. Erica teaches physical acting at Yale School of Drama and The New School’s MFA programs. She lives at Westbeth.

More info at: To Keep The Light.com

REVIEW from SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN: “… a gripping portrait… wonderfully mysterious… Fae’s Abbie is an entrancing blend of delicacy and strength, and the cinematography is just stunning.”

REVIEW from NASHVILLE SCENE: “women dominate this year’s NEW DIRECTORS category… TO KEEP THE LIGHT, erica fae’s slow-burning period drama, follows salt-of-the-earth abbie, who is tasked with tending to a lighthouse on a remote maine island during her husband’s illness. fae, who also stars in the film, has garnered praise for her work in theater, and it shows: she reveals her character through exacting body language that makes her situation visceral. inspired by true stories of women lighthouse keepers in the 1800s, TO KEEP THE LIGHT is beautifully shot, building tension against the harsh landscape, and fae proves to be a true new talent.”

TO KEEP THE LIGHT wins BEST OF SHOW: “… a unique film with a fascinating heroine who is as sturdy and distinctive as the maine coastline where the story takes place…”

REVIEW from the ORLANDO WEEKLY:

“first-time writer-director erica fae’s TO KEEP THE LIGHT is a quietly mesmerizing look at the lonely life of a lighthouse keeper’s wife who is struggling with her daily duties – and her sanity – while caring for her sick husband in 19th-century maine. when a mysterious stranger washes up on shore, she is forced to confront both her past and her future. shot much like a haunted-house thriller, the film takes on an ingmar bergman feel in the second half… its beauty and confidently methodical pacing – not to mention a solid performance by fae herself – make it one of the better offerings in the narrative features competition… captures the feel of the period and… features an interesting feminist theme.”

REVIEW from cinema365:

“every shot here is literally a work of art; this movie is like strolling through a museum where one great painting after another hangs on the wall… while this is her first feature film- with work like this, I sincerely hope ms. fae continues her work in the cinematic arts… fae gives the character an inner core that is stronger than steel and grabs the viewer’s attention and admiration. she may be one of the most memorable female characters you’ll see in any movie this year and you certainly won’t be forgetting any time soon after the credits roll…. an early candidate for my top films of 2016.”

REVIEW from THE MANEATER: “…a work of art and surreal beauty, this film is a must-watch because it throws light on obscured aspects of our history and imparts a valuable lesson of taking a stand for what is ours.”

FROM THE COLUMBIA TRIBUNE: ”… weds stunning visuals to the compelling story of a lighthouse keeper’s wife trying to care for her husband, their hime and herself…”

FIPRECI PRIZE ANNOUNCEMENT IN GERMAN PRESS

REVIEW from WILLAMETTE WEEK:

seven new movies to see this week: what to watch in portland (oregon) cinemas

“abbie is the wife of an ailing lighthouse keeper on an isolated island off the coast of 1867 maine. when a stranger washes up on her shore, she’s forced to confront her life and desires. based on the approximately 300 women who served as lighthouse attendants in the 1800s, this film offers a glimpse into the lives of often forgotten heroines…”

from WOMEN IN FILM & TV VANCOUVER:

“fae’s film displays a gift for both masterful composition and mesmerizing drama as she imparts this involving story of an embattled woman relegated to the fringes of society but determined to be respected.”

westbeth-movie-night-dec-7-movie-night

Film Screening:
FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
Special Guest, Donna Reed’s daughter, Mary Owen

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On the anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Westbeth Movie Night’s special event features Mary Owen, daughter of Academy Award winner, Donna Reed, to introduce the movie. FREE.

FROM HERE TO ETERNITY is a 1953 drama film directed by Fred Zinnemann and based on the novel by James Jones. The picture deals with the tribulations of three U.S. Army soldiers, played by Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift, and Frank Sinatra, stationed on Hawaii in the months leading up to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Deborah Kerr and Donna Reed portray the women in their lives and the supporting cast includes Ernest Borgnine, Philip Ober, Jack Warden, Mickey Shaughnessy, Claude Akins, and George Reeves.

The film won eight Academy Awards out of 13 nominations, including for Picture, Best Director (Fred Zinnemann), Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor (Frank Sinatra) and Supporting Actress (Donna Reed).[3] The film’s title comes originally from a quote from Rudyard Kipling’s 1892 poem “Gentlemen-Rankers”, about soldiers of the British Empire who had “lost [their] way” and were “damned from here to eternity.”

From Here to Eternity was selected in 2002 for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

source: Wikipedia

Valentina Du Basky RED HORSE AND CRANE

Valentina Du Basky receives 2016
Fulbright Specialist Grant to India

Valentina Du Basky RED HORSE AND CRANE

Valentina Du Basky RED HORSE AND CRANE

The Fulbright Specialist Program provides an opportunity to Indian universities and institutions of higher learning to draw on the expertise of U.S. scholars and professionals and develop linkages with American institutions. Specialist grants focus on strengthening and supporting the development needs of institutions and broadening institutional cooperation. Fulbright Specialists work in their areas of expertise as they enhance their understanding (of the cultural and education contexts) of the host country through engagement with the host community.

For more ofthe work by Valentina DuBasky, click HERE

write-now-poster-dec-2016

WRITE NOW
A Participatory Installation
December 10 – 31, 2016

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Our world seems to be in upheaval. People are looking for some way to express their concerns and hope for the future. “WRITE NOW” will give them the opportunity to express those feelings in the Westbeth Gallery.

How the show works: Upon entry into the gallery, the participant is asked to donate a $1 or more to canisters representing 5 locally-based New York charities
Planned Parenthood NYAli Forney CenterGod’s Love We DeliverCabrini Immigrant ServicesThe Alliance for Greater NY

Visitors will use as many post- it notes as they want to express their thoughts about 2016 and their hopes for 2017.

You can draw, collage, paint, write, and sculpt.

Main Room : What Do You Want the World to Bring into 2017?

Rear Room: What Do You Want the World to Leave in 2016?


Side Room 1 : What Do You Want to Bring into 2017?

Small Side 2 Want to Leave in 2016?

We will have a “Westbeth Only Preview Night” on Dec 9th. All Westbeth residents will be invited to post their notes that evening. The Public Opening will occur on Dec 10th. The show will run through Dec 31st.

Beverly Brodsky’s painting featured in Art in Embassies program

art in Embassies Exhibition

BEVERLY BRODSKY’S PAINTINGS FEATURED IN ART IN EMBASSIES PROGRAM IN SIERRA LEONE

For five decades Art In Embassies Program has played a leading role in U.S. public diplomacy through a focused mission of vital cross- cultural dialogue through the visual arts. It was first created by MOMA AND President John F. Kennedy who formalized it in 1963 at the U. S. Department of State.

Beverly Brodsky’s paintings were selected for installation at the American Embassy in Freetown, Sierra Leone, for a period of two to three years and will be open for public viewing as a cross-cultural exchange beginning 2015.

“It is a fulcrulm of America’s global leadership as we work for freedom, human rights and peace around the world.”

– U.S. Secretary of State, John Forbes Kerry

June Glasson

New York Foundation for the Arts presents “Decensortized – A Safe Space” curated by David C. Terry

June Glasson

June Glasson

Peter Drake

Peter Drake

Decensortized comes from the notion that we are sensitized towards certain things and we are also censored by many things. Censored not in the traditional sense, but self-censored subconsciously. This exhibition invites artists to look within their own psyche and explore how and why they self-censor and in what capacity, and respond to, and showcase those concepts and discoveries.

This multidisciplinary exhibition includes work from Thordis Adalsteinsdottir ‘12, Mari Jaye Blanchard ‘12, Shamus Clisset ‘14, Peter Drake‘06, Seth Michael Forman ‘04, ‘08, Judy Fox ‘09, Ella Gant ‘11, June Glasson ‘11, Michael Greathouse ‘11, Rebecca Loyche ’10, Charles
McGill ‘09, Karen Miranda-Rivadeneira ‘10 and Anne Muntges ‘14. 

Rose Corsica provided in partnership by Entwine. Join us after the reception for happy hour
specials from 9 – 11pm at Entwine @ 765 Washington Street. www.entwinenyc.com

Image credit: Peter Drake (Fellow in Painting ’06), M/oral Pathology II Axis of Evil, 2007, Acrylic on canvas;
June Glasson (Fellow in Printmaking/Drawing/Artists’ Books ’11), Charlottenburg.6, 2014, pencil, ink and gouache