Category Archives: Current Events

SANDRA CAPLAN Adriatic, 40'X32_, O_L, sandra caplan 2014

Sandra Caplan: Paintings Part Two

SANDRA CAPLAN Adriatic, 40'X32_, O_L, sandra caplan 2014

My past and recent work explores the possibilities of the still life, that is, the same and similar subjects, flowers, fruit and vegetables, photos, objects, placed on vividly colored and patterned fabrics. The still life is often set against an open sea view or landscape, near the shade of a palm or placed on a table top within the studio. An accent of a drape or architectural reference is incorporated at times, referring back to visual details found in favorite paintings or to the memory of a place. There is this reference to a landscape or city view depending on where the work originated.
These compositions offer a complex formality that is the culmination of acute observation, heightened by a painterly approach and highly developed color sense.

For further information please refer to the website: www.sandracaplan.com
or contact the artist at sandrray@gmail.com

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David Seccombe: Wall to Wall #25

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After 43 years of working in the same West Village basement studio, what do you do when Sandy comes and wipes it all out? If you are David Seccombe, you paint on your dining room table, planning new pieces. You borrow time in a friend’s studio, cut out modular segments and make a wall-to-wall sculpture that looks like it was built in a big barn.

David says, “When you make a painting you use the whole format, from side to side; that’s what I do in sculpture.” His latest work, which spans the Project Room from side to side, is the third installation he has made for this site, but just one of the scores of drawings and elevations in his growing archive of ideas.

David Seccombe’s first sculpture exhibit, in 1961 at the Brata Gallery on 3rd Avenue and 10th Street, featured a large metal piece which hung from the ceiling. In the half-century since then, his work has been shown across the country and internationally, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, N.Y.F.A., the Adolph & Esther Gottlieb Foundation, and others.

A Westbeth “pioneer” he and his family moved in while the cement was still fresh on the stairway in their apartment. Many of his older pieces are familiar features of our courtyard landscape.

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FELDENKRAIS Class
at Westbeth

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Thursday at 4pm – 5pm,
Taught by Doron Tadmore Guild-certified Feldenkrais teacher

Westbeth Community Room 155 Bank St (enter through courtyard) between Washington and West Streets. Take A C L or E Train to 14th St and 8th Avenue and walk south to Bank St. Turn left.

$5.00 per class

Contact: Sandra Kingsbury westbethperformance@gmail.com

Sponsored by Westbeth Beautfication Committee

Awareness Through Movement consists of verbally directed movement sequences presented primarily to groups. A lesson generally lasts from thirty to sixty minutes. Each lesson is usually organized around a particular function.

In Awareness Through Movement lessons, people engage in precisely structured movement explorations that involve thinking, sensing, moving, and imagining. Many are based on developmental movements and ordinary functional activities. Some are based on more abstract explorations of joint, muscle, and postural relationships. The lessons consist of comfortable, easy movements that gradually evolve into movements of greater range and complexity.

Awareness Through Movement lessons attempt to make one aware of his/her habitual neuromuscular patterns and rigidities and to expand options for new ways of moving while increasing sensitivity and improving efficiency. There are hundreds of Awareness Through Movement lessons contained in the Feldenkrais Method that vary, for all levels of movement ability, from simple in structure and physical demand, to more difficult lessons.

A major goal of Awareness Through Movement is to learn how one’s most basic functions are organized and improve. By experiencing the details of how one performs any action, the student has the opportunity to learn how to:

attend to his/her whole self
eliminate unnecessary energy expenditure
mobilize his/her intentions into actions
learn and improve